About the Finn in the other end of the cable

Eastern Finland, Finland
Hello and thank you for visiting my blog! I'm DW and I'm 19 years old Finnish guy who has grown carnivorous plants since 2009 alongside with orchids, bromeliads, cacti and chilies. Besides growing plants I keep this blog, take photos, cook, read books and watch movies. At the moment I'm highschool graduate studying audiovisual communication in career college. For contacts my e-mail address is kihokki01[at]gmail[dot]com. You can also find here my grow list and want list

Sunday, August 19, 2012

Ping-Ping-Pinguicula update

It has been a while since I've posted pictures of my Pinguicula.

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One of the loveliest pinguicula at the moment are P. emarginata x (moranensis x ehlersiae) triplets.


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Pinguicula emarginata has totally conquered it's pot and is blooming non stop
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Pinguicula x Tina has revived and is flowering again but is not too happy about it's small pot.
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P. esseriana is a nice plant, which I think I should propagate more through leaf cuttings. One big plant looks too lonely.
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P. moranensis x ehlersiae a.k.a. fake Weser. Nothing special about this plant but it would be nice if it was just a bit bigger.
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P. laueana is having nice reddish colour on it's leaves and I hope that the plant is soon ready to bloom.
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That's all so far about my Pinguicula. The summer is soon gone and autumn is coming. Just hoping that the weather would warm a bit for the end of the summer. All the plants have grown very rapidly and most of the plants have developed very beautiful colour in my greenhouse. Next post will 100% sure include Sarracenia and flytraps because I want to show you how you can have good results with them even in this north.

Friday, August 17, 2012

New Utricularia and Pinguicula

Yesterday arrived P. moctezumae and U. geminiloba from Zlatokrt. Big plants in very good condition. Posting new blog post with photos soon.

Thursday, August 09, 2012

U. asplundii and a flowering pygmy

Nothing more but a small update of two plants.

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U. asplundii seeds received from Sebulon germinated quickly and the plants have even 3 leaves. They grow in mixture of peat and sand with some fine orchid bark. They have been growing in room temperature all time and I hope that this will make the most fittest plants to survive in my conditions. Can't wait till they are big enough to flower.

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My own gemmae grown D. omissa x pulchella flowering is a nice sight.

For the next blog update I'm going to write about some of my stickier plants.

Thursday, August 02, 2012

Focusing on epiphytic Utricularia

Epiphytic Utricularia are plants that I have gathered most during this spring. Before this spring and summer I cultivated only U. alpina, reniformis and nephrophylla. Later I got U. nelumbifolia, alpina x humboldtii, alpina x endresii and nelumbifolia x reniformis which I think are quite easy plants to grow. I also bought some seeds of U. apslundii which germinated and I will soon post a pic of the babies. Photobucket Here is my collection of epiphytic Utricularia. Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket U. nephrophylla from Serra dos Orgaos blooms regularly in my conditions and is very heat tolerant. Photobucket U. nelumbifolia from Serra do Brigadeiro is a vigorous grower when I keep the water level near the soil level Photobucket Photobucket U. reniformis lost some of it's leaves when I took the plant outdoors. The leaves are a bit stronger now and there are already signs of increased growth thanks to higher light levels. Photobucket Photobucket By the first look U. alpina x endresii looks dead but underground tubers have not rotted. I still have high hopes on this plant. Photobucket Photobucket When U. nelumbifolia x reniformis arrived it had only one leaf which decayed short after it's arrival but after that plant showed it's hybrid vigor and is maybe the fastest growing of my epiphytes. The biggest leaf has some kind of hydrofobic surface which allows the waterdrops ro roll over the leaf. This is kinda weird characteristic which I have not seen on any carnivorous plant before. Photobucket Photobucket U. alpina x humboldtii looks first like it has done nothing since it arrived but after a long wait if finally started growing a new leaf. Photobucket U. alpina didn't like it when I took it off the pot just to see it's "roots". I then repotted it to new sphagnum moss. Now the plant is growing new leaves again and hopefully I will see some flowers when the weather gets colder.